Craig Titus 90,000 miles of experience from Southern Maryland

Wow! My second workshop was even better than the first, and I had thought that one tons o’ fun and tremendously beneficial (and make no mistake, it was indeed).  However, what I know after my second workshop—2 years and 20+K miles of twisties after my first—is I had quite a bit more to learn.

Though I went this time ready to challenge myself, I was shocked by how much improved I was and how effortless the change seemed. Jim quickly recognized what skills I needed, and simply showed me a better, more efficient way of riding the mountain twisties as well as invisible roads. He showed me what true mastery is of a motorcycle and that there is yet far more for me to learn.  For now, there are skills I need to continue practice to make my own.

That said, my riding has changed already.  Gone is the mental fatigue I was experiencing due to allowing myself to become somewhat lazy about my visual habits and posture.  Gone are the “Oops” moments I had actually grown accustom to by over-riding my skill set by over-focusing on speed (the habit of grabbing handfuls of throttle for a “cheap thrill”).  Gone are former worries and concerns about gravel and poor traction.  I can now say without question that I have grown significantly as a rider.  I have re-embraced the efficiency, power, and thrill of riding smooth, which is already increasing the joy my riding experience.

For me, Riding Smooth is about riding with grace; maintaining a heightened awareness, striving for precision of action, and seamlessly responding to conditions of every moment of every ride.  I’m grateful for Jim’s course and am certain I will attend again next year (if only one of the one day courses).

The learning experience aside, it was spectacularly enjoyable weekend. Although I know and have before ridden many of the roads we traveled on during this workshop (as I live in the area), the experience was completely different; at once less intense on the body and mind, and more intense to the memory and pleasing to the soul.  In a word … Zen.

Craig
Southern, MD